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New era for the software industry

On May 29, more than 700 people attended the 14th Lindholmen Software Development Day. This year’s theme was the deliberately ambiguous Software talks. In the sweltering summer heat, over 30 speakers shared their views of the rapid development of trends and technologies in the software industry.

Lindholmen Software Development Day 2018 also included opportunities to participate in workshops and to engage in dialogue with several of the speakers in Open space. In addition, about 30 companies took part in an exhibition to showcase their new products and services, and visitors were able to test new technologies.

pontus-de-laval2.jpgFirst out on the conference scene was Pontus de Laval, Chief Technology Officer at Saab, the major Swedish supplier of military defense and civil security products and services. His topic was How to build the future on open source code when the degree of automation increases.

"Software is the key to Saab’s products," confirmed de Laval. Military systems have traditionally had a large part of internally developed software. With ever-increasing complexity, this will be impossible in the future. The path Saab has chosen is using open source but with a high level of quality assurance through a set of automated tools. Another challenge is connectivity. Previously military systems were unplugged. Now, Saab’s customers have realized the major gains of being connected. Security thus becomes absolutely critical.  

One key lies in having control over the network layer - then cyber security can be built in your basic architecture,” he said.

Inviting visitors to test new technologies is a highlight of the event, and demos of augmented vr.jpgand virtual reality (AR/VR) were under high pressure at Visual Arena. The consumer experience and benefits have developed at the same pace as the technology. Visitors could test virtual conference rooms, visit a vehicle showroom and also test new car models – either in toy size, or park them in full scale.

Lena Apler, well-known founder and now Chair of Collector Bank, appeared together with Magnus Lenngren, the bank’s Senior Technical Advisor. They asked the question: AI – a hit, or a threat?

According to Apler, artificial intelligence (AI) enables lena_apler_inkl-text.pngefficient processing of massive amounts of data without human involvement. The automation can help minimize boring, repetitive tasks. People will have time to do other more important and enjoyable things. The threat lies in AI penetrating too far into our brains and making us do things we don’t want.

Apler’s summary of the risks and benefits of artificial intelligence were:
Used correctly, the benefits are huge. Used incorrectly, AI could pose a threat to our very existence."

Collector Bank was founded just 18 years ago and invests heavily in development. Lena Apler spoke now about ‘a long drawn-out death for conventional banks’:

I believe we are entering a completely new era,” she said. “Now that customers own their own data they will obviously start making demands.”

After her speech, Lena Apler expressed her appreciation for being able to participate in Software Development Day.

Being part of this type of event is great, because it means we are perceived as a digital bank that uses the latest technology. And being able to meet people from other industries in this manner is vital,” she said.

Åke Wåssén (R&D Manager) and Mathias Elmeskog (Image Quality Specialist) from hasslebladinkl-text.pngHasselblad presented one of the final speeches for the day: From light to image by Hasselblad.

Hasselblad began its rapid and world-famous production of cameras in Gothenburg in the early 1940s and following ownership changes the headquarters to Copenhagen for a few years, but the but changed back to Gothenburg a few years ago and based its headquarters in Lindholmen.

Wåssén and Elmeskog described Hasselblad’s digital journey in a vivid manner – how this company working in the medium format segment is leveraging opportunities to develop special solutions “that tend to stick out and are obviously appreciated by our customers.”

“And it’s nice to show how we are based here at Lindholmen, to let people see us in a broader context, and that we are innovative and create the best photography products,” said Mathias Elmeskog.

Åke Wåssén added:
Yes, we really want to show how we work and how we need people in order to grow. That’s what makes this forum so good.

They both emphasized the value of being part of the innovative environment at Lindholmen, which Wåssén calls Sweden’s Silicon Valley:
There is a fantastic concentration of competencies here.